Wednesday, February 1, 2017

Reading will never be the same #IWSG



Hi, everyone.

Welcome to my IWSG post. It's where writers share their thoughts, insecurities, and encouraging words. Thanks to Alex Cavanaugh and our co-hosts for keeping IWSG going.  Click here to learn more about the group. Co-Hosts this month: Misha GerickeLK HillJuneta KeyJoylene Buter.


I'm doing okay with my insecurities, which I shoved in a box at the end of 2016. I haven't had time to open it, which is okay by me. Since my insecurities are tucked away, I thought I'd share some inspiration instead. So the next time you're feeling insecure remember:

Believe in yourself. 
Appreciate your unique perspective.
Write what speaks to you.
First drafts don't have to be perfect.


February's question:

How has being a writer changed your experience as a reader? 


I've always been a finicky reader. A book has to hook me with beautiful writing, relatable characters, or a kick ass plot. That hasn't changed. What has changed is that I'm more aware of a story's mechanics. This can be a good thing and a bad thing. When a book is well-written, I'm not only engaged by the plot, but I find myself paying attention to how the author puts together her prose, describes scenes, weaves together plot lines, builds worlds, and creates intriguing characters. The bad is that I notice when these things are missing from a book. I'm pulled out of the story. If it keeps happening, I end up putting down the book.


In other news:

Chris Fey has a copy of 
Seismic Crimes up for grabs. Click here to learn more about her exciting new book and to enter the giveaway.

Any words of inspiration you'd like to share? Are you a writer? Has being one changed your experience as a reader? Have you checked out Tsunami Crimes? 


Thanks for stopping by!

17 comments:

  1. It's the exact same for me, Cherie. I'm enthralled by a talented writer but I put the book down far sooner than I used to. Too bad writing can interfere with our reading enjoyment!

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    1. Yep. Sometimes I force myself to shutdown my writer's eye. This has gotten me through some books that I know would be good if I'd just stop critiquing as I read. Like Alex notes below, in these cases I make a mental note not to do whatever is bothering me in my writing. :)

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  2. I totally get it. Actually, I found I went through a stage where I got more picky, and then less again. There are still certain elements that will make me close a book, but it took a while before I relaxed into reading anything again.

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    1. I go through those stages also. Glad it's not just me.

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  3. That makes you appreciate the good books even more. But we can learn from the bad - just don't do what they do.

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  4. I really ought to pay more attention to the mechanics when I'm reading a good book so I can learn from it. If it's a really good book, I usually end up too engrossed to analyze.

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  5. I'm not sure I've put down a book yet once I realized it was missing some plot elements, but I'm sure my interested dropped. I probably just switched over to critique mode and amde sure I never did the same thing in my books.

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    1. Usually the books I put down are the ones that keep breaking their own rules or when I don't relate to the characters. And I usually try to get through 50-100 pages before putting a book down. Especially if it was recommended to me or is a best seller.

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  6. I have to be hooked from the beginning when I read a book. I like something to happen right away, and I adore beautiful writing.

    Thank you so much for the shout our, although...It's a copy of Seismic Crimes that's up for grabs. Confusing, I know. :P

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  7. I like voice and character. Those will hook me. I will forgive most things if the story has good voice and character. :)

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    1. It is easy to become lost in a story that has a great voice and characters.

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  8. Looks like writers have the similar experiences when reading someone's novel. Makes me wonder if I should stop doing reviews since I've become much more critical than non-writer readers.

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    1. I know several people who are authors and reviewers. It's really a personal choice, so if you love doing both I think that's okay.

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  9. Wishing you great success, Cherie.

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